photo courtesy: ocacia.com

Black American Women And Foreign Black Men: A Perfect Match?

A friend sent me this Article from IdateDaily.com website. Very interesting read. I'm not altering the article so you could read it the way its written.   For at least two decades, American media has been obsessed with placing Black women’s love life (or lack thereof) on television for the world to pathologize. Why can’t a successful Black woman find a man?is the headlining title for a special featured on ABC’s “Nightline.” The question was parroted by Oprah, the Washington Post,  CNN, and many others. Unfortunately, it’s still asked to date. The media’s attempts to answer the question almost always ends…

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User Rating: 3.95 ( 1 votes)

A friend sent me this Article from IdateDaily.com website. Very interesting read. I’m not altering the article so you could read it the way its written.

 

For at least two decades, American media has been obsessed with placing Black women’s love life (or lack thereof) on television for the world to pathologize. Why can’t a successful Black woman find a man?is the headlining title for a special featured on ABC’s “Nightline.” The question was parroted by Oprah, the Washington Post,  CNN, and many others. Unfortunately, it’s still asked to date.

The media’s attempts to answer the question almost always ends with there being something wrong with Black women — they’re too rigid, they’re too attitudinal, they’re too independent, etc. — although there has been and currently is mounting evidence proving that systemic oppression, specifically the mass incarceration of Black men, has virtually dismantled the nuclear Black family structure.

he Economist published a riveting article titled “Sëx and the single Black woman,” which vividly and thoroughly explains how the mass incarceration of Black men has left very little options for women of color, who, statistically speaking, are more likely to date someone of the same race and are more educated than men and women in the United States. As one can imagine, it’s a challenge for a professional woman to date a man who has been marginalized by institutional racism and unable to secure a career with a living wage due to his criminal record.

photo courtesy: ocacia.com

photo courtesy: ocacia.com

So what should a beautiful, highly educated Black woman whose preference is to date a professional Black man do? She may consider dating a foreign Black man if a Black American man isn’t an option. Although they may face adversities throughout their life because they’re also Black, foreign Black men (e.g. Jamaicans, Nigerians, Brazilians, etc.) are typically raised with strong family values and place a high value on working hard and being educated. Because they were not raised in America, which is believed to be the most racist country in the world, foreign Black men tend to have more pride than American Black men because they were raised to be proud of themselves and their heritage. Black American men, who’ve been stripped of their heritage, are often vilified when they exude pride in being Black.

There may be some cultural differences between foreign Black men and American Black women that must be considered before the two decide to date; however, there is no perfection in love and life. We are all challenged to make tough decisions that will meet our needs instead of our wants.

So what do you think.

A friend sent me this Article from IdateDaily.com website. Very interesting read. I'm not altering the article so you could read it the way its written.   For at least two decades, American media has been obsessed with placing Black women’s love life (or lack thereof) on television for the world to pathologize. Why can’t a successful Black woman find a man?is the headlining title for a special featured on ABC’s “Nightline.” The question was parroted by Oprah, the Washington Post,  CNN, and many others. Unfortunately, it’s still asked to date. The media’s attempts to answer the question almost always ends…

Review Overview

User Rating: 3.95 ( 1 votes)

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4 comments

  1. Proud to be a Nigerian…..I had an argument with a black American woman on this topic and believe me she was so mad at me for saying I am better than most black American guys. I only asked her to name 5 black American guys in her life that are graduates or 2 with Masters..she couldn’t even name 3 graduates and felt I was picking on her family and friends…I had to take her to a Chinese buffet to placate her because I feared for my life oooo….make her hommies no go de ona de mi ooo

    • LOL Kimono. Actually, there are quite a handful of highly educated African American men, however, the ratio to women might not be high. Let’s take a look at Nigerians too. I have heard many Nigerian women complain of the lack of “qualified” Nigerian men. In this case, is it okay to go outside the culture?

  2. What I take away most from this article is simply this: ‘there is no perfection in love and life. We are all challenged to make tough decisions that will meet our needs instead of our wants.”..I think that about sums it up. BTW I am married to an African American man (going on 9 years) and I am as much of a Yoruba woman (grew up in Ibadan) as they come….You cannot get anymore Yoruba woman than me…Just like there are many things you cannot legislate, there are many things you cannot but a Statistical analysis on..I happen to think, and this is debatable of course that Love and marriage is one of such things..

    • Thank you sis. I will extend the quote to: “There may be some cultural differences between foreign Black men and American Black women that must be considered before the two decide to date; however, there is no perfection in love and life. We are all challenged to make tough decisions that will meet our needs instead of our wants.” In ANY relationship, cultural differences must be considered, ALL differences must be considered. I agree on there being no perfection in love and life. Obviously from your personal experience, it is okay to move out of your culture. (I have not issues with it. One has to do what works for one) Looking at it from our cultural perspective, yes, we do have a LOT of educated Nigerians, BUT, are they “qualified?” Education does not make someone “qualified” for another. There is definitely a lot to consider.

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